Journal 6/26/’19

Berkeley, Thursday, June 27, 2019 4:45 AM

It belongs to Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Today, I worked on the history of watershed development. The forestry management history provides an intersting platform for that purpose.

Both have growth together. Wooden vegetation management is essential for water and soil management, and has influence in the climate conditions.

I analyzed as well the Po River basin, and the source of the floods in the 16th century in it.

Recalling to prior comment about Marx and Engels, I have limited side time for learning further about them, but I will do. Reading some background on the planning theory, and working in general provided me the opportunity to explore a bit about the totalitarian ideologies, and that is a utopia the perfect plans. We live in a world where we do plans for adaptive management. Meaning, we of course have long and short term plans, and we learn as we implement it.

I commit to learn Marx without prejudice as academic. It is great to read read a thinker. Although, I am convinced, up-to-date, that the economic liberal economies work better. Adam Smith as a side reading will take long, and a heavy weight as pocket book.

From the sustainability perspective, Garrett Hardin (1968)’s article Tragedy of Commons, provide an argument of setting limits and regulations to the use of resources. For my still economic ignorant point of view, the economic liberal, with regulations, such as water quality regulations, air quality regulations, which we have learned from monitoring and experience, which allow us to forecast, and to set goals, is the way.

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